The diabetes drug is under fire for its reported complications that could include heart failure. But what is even more surprising is the allegations that Takeda, the drug manufacturer, knew of said risks to the heart before Actos was sent out to market.

 
It was way back in 1999 that Actos was first introduced to the market. Packaged as a safe alternative in the treatment of diabetes, the drug swiftly caught on. However, as those who suffer from Actos side effects such as congestive heart failure reached thousands, the FDA ordered boxed warnings be put in place in the drug’s packaging.
 
It may not be clear how many have actually suffered heart failure from Actos use. What is clear, however, is the fact that there are thousands of lawsuits against Takeda over Actos pending nationwide concerning cancer and other side effects.
 
Forewarned But Not Forearmed
 
One of the the side effect allegedly caused by Actos is cardiomyopathy. This condition weakens the muscles of the heart and thereby decreases the circulation of the blood. Because of this, arrhythmia could ensue and the proper functioning of the organs severely affected.
 
It has been asserted that Takeda knew of this heart complication before Actos was marketed. A clinical trial ran by the company involved 5,238 patients being administered either Actos or a placebo. The results show that a higher number of patients who took Actos developed a “serious heart failure” event as compared to the other group.
 
More surprisingly, there were more reported deaths from heart failure with those patients taking Actos. And though this data were already available to Takeda , the manufacturer still proceeded with the release of the product.
 
Compounding Evidence
 
The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)  has  published a study regarding Actos. It concluded that there was an increase in the risk of “heart failure” with the drug as compared to other anti-diabetes drugs.
 
Finally, another warning was placed on Actos in 2007. This was in response to growing evidence that showed a distinctively higher risk for congestive heart failure that exists for Actos users.
 
Takeda has been accused of downplaying these known complications. For this reason, many have cried foul and filed a lawsuit.
 
In the hope of finding justice, thousands of lawsuits against Takeda have been filed all over the country. Assembling an Actos lawsuit could be a painstaking process for it requires details to be in proper order. It is a good thing that the internet through sites like rotlaw.com of the Rottenstein Law Group (RLG) has been an unprecedented ally in this legal pursuit.
 
For those alleged victims of Actos-related heart failure who have died, a lawsuit could be the  best way to pay respects to the dead. But more importantly, a just compensation provides the only means to supplement  the living, left behind by such tragic loss.